Voting rights, a partisan issue? Yes, Republicans have fallen that far

OPINION — Stacey Abrams has it right, for right now. She lost her 2018 race to be the governor of Georgia to Republican Brian Kemp, who as secretary of state was in charge of the election, a situation that would not pass the sniff test in North Korea.

OK, that comparison is a little far-fetched, but only a little.

Since then, though, she’s been plenty busy, confirming that, yes, she would be open to a vice presidential spot on the 2020 Democratic ticket and locking down a network TV deal for a drama based on one of her novels.

Most importantly, though, through her group Fair Fight, she has been fighting for voting rights, an issue that’s bigger than one election and always has been.

Despite the GOP talking point that the impeachment inquiry is crowding out important work, under Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the House has been passing legislation, only to see those bills die in the Senate under the strict command of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Last week, another proposed bill joined the list, with little doubt that it too would meet the same Senate fate. The two parties can’t even agree on what to call it. For Democrats, and officially, it is the Voting Rights Advancement Act. Republicans have dubbed it the “The Federal Control of Elections Act.”

Not too subtle.

Mary C. Curtis: Articles of Impeachment Debate

CHARLOTTE, NC  — Now that house democrats have laid out impeachment charges against President Donald Trump– the debate officially begins.

Political contributor Mary C. Curtis discusses what’s next in the process.

POLITICAL WRAP: Lack of Diversity on Democratic Debate Stage?

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Next week, the democratic candidates for president will meet again on the debate stage. But now the field is beginning to narrow. So far, only six candidates have qualified.

And with California Senator Kamala Harris dropping out of the race last week, some Democrats worry there will be a lack of diversity on the stage December 19th.

WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in this week’s political wrap.

Buttigieg Seeks Black Voter Support as Presidential Race Shifts

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Though his support has surged in early caucus and primary states Iowa and New Hampshire, 2020 Democratic hopeful Pete Buttigieg has low polling numbers in states with a more diverse voting base. In South Carolina, he is polling in the very low single digits, which is a step up from his former number of 0%. Though he has funds and momentum, the South Bend, Indiana, mayor might hit a wall in a party that depends on a strong African-American and Hispanic voting base.

Minority voters — African-American women in particular — were key in recent elections that turned Virginia state government blue and re-elected a Democratic governor in Louisiana after President Trump campaigned for his opponent. Can Buttigieg solve this problem and save his chances to be the nominee?

And what does it say about the 2020 race on the Democratic side, which started out with such a diverse group, now that California Sen. Kamala Harris has dropped out and the slate for the December debate has narrowed to top candidates who do not reflect that party’s racial diversity. (Mary C. Curtis)

POLITICAL WRAP: Impeachment Hearings Move to Judiciary Committee

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – The White House now has until Friday to decide whether or not to participate in the next round of House Impeachment Hearings. The deadline comes just days before the first hearings with the House Judiciary Committee get under way. Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham responded to the invitation, saying the offer is being reviewed, but that the President has done nothing wrong.

Click above for more with WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis.

Mary C. Curtis: Bloomberg, Impeachment

Michael Bloomberg says he knows what it takes to beat President Trump. Meanwhile, the House Judiciary Committee will hold its first impeachment hearing on December 4th. Political contributor Mary C. Curtis is covering it all.

Bloomberg, Biden, Buttigieg and the bunch apologize. Should black voters listen, forgive and vote?

OPINION — Of course, Michael Bloomberg went there — there being a black church to ask for forgiveness. As he tentatively dips his toe and his billions into the Democratic presidential race, joining a scrum that expands even as it shrinks, Bloomberg, perhaps realizing that the path to the presidency must include the enthusiastic support of black and brown voters, has rethought his enthusiastic support of “stop and frisk.”

“I got something important really wrong,” he told the congregation at the Christian Cultural Center in Brooklyn on Sunday. “I didn’t understand back then the full impact that stops were having on the black and Latino communities.”

As New York City mayor, Bloomberg insisted that in order to fight crime, police must have the power to stop anyone judged a potential lawbreaker, which translated to ritualizing a practice that humiliated hundreds of thousands of black and brown New Yorkers who were detained, questioned and patted down because of “furtive movements” or some other vague justification. The number of stops rose to more than 685,000 in 2011, with no citations made or charges brought nearly 90 percent of the time.

Impeachment Hearings Week 2

CHARLOTTE, NC — Key witnesses and EU ambassador Gordon Sondland give testimony in the impeachment inquiry. Political contributor Mary C. Curtis discusses the biggest takeaways from week 2 of testimony.

POLITICAL WRAP: North Carolina Congressional Redistricting; Louisiana Governor’s Race

 

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – This week, the fight over North Carolina’s congressional redistricting continues. There’s a lawsuit challenging the replacement map approved by the Republican-controlled General Assembly.

The new map would threaten the re-election hopes of two current Republican house members. But Democrats say the re-draw still isn’t fair.

A three-judge panel blocked the current map from being used again in 2020, saying it favors the GOP.

Meantime, John Bel Edwards will be Louisiana’s Governor for four more years. The Democrat narrowly won Saturday’s runoff election against Republican challenger Eddie Rispone, who was heavily backed by President Donald Trump.

Clock above more with WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis.

With ‘lynching’ comment, Trump retreats to his racist comfort zone

OPINION — When Mamie Elizabeth Till-Mobley sent her 14-year-old son, Emmett, to visit relatives in Mississippi, she never thought he would return in a casket, a victim of a mother’s nightmare and America’s shame. A group of white men kidnapped, tortured, mutilated and murdered him that summer in 1955 for the “crime” of flirting with a white woman, who years later admitted to lying about their supposed interaction.

Mr. President, that’s a lynching.