Black Issues Forum: Election 2020: What Comes Next?

Election Day has come and gone, but Black communities in North Carolina could potentially feel the aftereffects for years to come. This week, Black Issues Forum is peeling back the layers on North Carolina’s biggest political races and breaking down what they could mean for African Americans in our state.

Local News Roundup: Post-Election Edition

On the next Charlotte Talks local news roundup …

The election night that we’ve been gearing up for over the last four years arrived this week … and lingered. We’ll talk about the big local and state races as well as where local voters showed up for presidential candidates — and where possible, we’ll provide results.

There was no widespread violence in North Carolina on Election Day, but an arrest in the University City-area precinct, a march in Alamance that ended in a pepper spray incident the weekend prior to the election and an overnight march in Raleigh on election night could be the first in demonstrations about results here and around the country.

Charlotte’s three bond referendums took easy victories in the election this week, approving spending of over $197 million for transportation, affordable housing and neighborhood improvements. We’ll talk about exactly where that money will go.

Those stories and an update on COVID-19 in North Carolina as Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters delve into this week’s top stories on the Charlotte Talks local news roundup.

In North Carolina, red and blue don’t make purple

North Carolina is a political player, a battleground state visited and fought over by national candidates in both parties. And Charlotte has had challenges that mirror those of many big American cities: protests and debates over police reform and frustrations that all citizens don’t share in its economic growth and opportunity. Mary C. Curtis speaks to Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles about the election and what comes next.

Mary C. Curtis: Election Results 2020

CHARLOTTE, NC — President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden are locked in tight races in battleground states across the country.

Trump won Florida, Ohio and Iowa, important battlegrounds, but races were too early to call in other fiercely contested states, including North Carolina, Georgia and Pennsylvania.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis has breakdown of the results.

You can also check out Mary’s podcast ‘Equal Time.’

POLITICAL WRAP: Two Days until the Election

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Two days until Election Day and early voting records show a tight race and an involved electorate.

Candidates and their families are flooding North Carolina in the closing days of the campaign.

So, will we know the results on Election Night?

Some political experts say we might not know who won for days or weeks.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis gives us her take as we approach Election Day.

Mary C. Curtis: Candidates Try to Close Deal in North Carolina

CHARLOTTE, NC — Less than 2 weeks until election day and both campaigns are making their rounds to key states including, North Carolina.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis talks about the candidates final push ahead of November 3rd.

POLITICAL WRAP: Candidates in North Carolina; Final Presidential Debate

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Two weeks and two days until the November 3rd election.

Millions across the country have already voted early, including more than 98,000 people in Mecklenburg County.

The candidates are in our area this week, fighting for any voters who remain undecided.

President Trump will hold a rally in Gastonia on Wednesday, while former Vice President Joe Biden spent the day Sunday in Durham.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in the video above.

Local News Roundup: COVID-19 Numbers Up In NC; Vance High Gets New Name; Early Voting; Remembering Judy Williams

On the next Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup:

North Carolina’s coronavirus numbers are creeping back up under Phase 3, and state Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy Cohen urges residents to remain vigilant, stating that she’s no longer able to pinpoint a specific location or cause, and that “this virus is everywhere.”

CMS begins its first round of in-person classes this week as Pre-K students return to school. We’ll get an update on how that went as well as other CMS news, including the week’s COVID-19 numbers and the renaming of Vance High School.

Early voting started this week in North Carolina, and candidates are descending on Charlotte and other locations around the state. We’ll give an update on all things “election,” including how potential voters are responding to news of the scandal in Cal Cunningham’s campaign, and record money raised by South Carolina candidate for U.S. Senate Jaime Harrison.

And we remember Judy Williams, the co-founder of Mothers of Murdered Offspring and anti-violence advocate in Charlotte who supported countless families of murder victims. She died last week after a battle with lung cancer.

Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters bring the week’s top news in the local news roundup.

Guests:

Erik Spanberg, managing editor for the Charlotte Business Journal.

Glenn Burkins, founder and publisher of qcitymetro.com.

Ann Doss Helms, WFAE’s Education Reporter.

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com, host of the Rollcall podcast “Equal Time” and contributor at WCCB-TV.

Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup: Phase 3 Reopening, CMS Adjusts Return Plan, CMPD Officers Resign

On the local news roundup, North Carolina moves into Phase 3 of reopening. With the state’s coronavirus metrics stable, Gov. Roy Cooper is easing restrictions to allow bars and other entertainment venues to open with reduced capacity. We find out what that means and check in our COVID-19 numbers.

The first CMS students began returning to the classroom this week, with more on the way. And the school board holds an emergency meeting to adjust their return to school plan for elementary students.

Five CMPD officers connected to the in-custody death of Harold Easter resign ahead of video release.

And county elections boards across the state have begun to process tens of thousands of absentee ballots.

Our roundtable of reporters fills us in on those stories and more.

Guests

Steve Harrison, WFAE’s Political Reporter

Claire Donnelly, WFAE’s health reporter

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com and WCCB-TV

Nick Ochsner, Chief Investigative Reporter at WBTV

Ann Doss Helms, WFAE’s education reporter

Trump’s ‘good genes’ rhetoric illustrates why the fight for justice never ends

It was one of lawyer Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s cases before she took her place on the Supreme Court or in pop culture memes. It is only occasionally mentioned, perhaps because the details illuminated a truth people prefer to look away from, so they can pretend that sort of thing could never happen here.

But something terrible did happen, to a teenager, sterilized in 1965 without fully consenting or understanding the consequences in a program that continued into the 1970s in the state of North Carolina. The girl became a woman whose marriage and life crashed before her story became the basis of a lawsuit Ginsburg filed in federal court that helped expose the state’s eugenics program. While North Carolina’s was particularly aggressive, other states implemented their own versions, long ago given a thumbs up by the U.S. Supreme Court in a 1927 decision written by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.